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New cancer treatment shows promise in animal testing

Bryan Alaspa's picture

Scientists have announced that a new cancer treatment has shown some promising results in animal testing. The Australian study is a new method of attacking the cancer cells themselves and it appears to avoid two of the hazards and problems inherent with current chemotherapy treatments. Most chemotherapy cannot target the specific cells and cancer cells can develop a resistance to it.

In the test, first announced in the Nature Biotechnology Sunday edition, shows how mice were implanted with a human uterine tumor. The tumor was very aggressive and drug resistant, just like many human uterine tumors. In each case the animals were completely free of cancer cells after 70 days of treatment. The control group of mice that were left untreated all died.

The company behind the research, EnGeneIC, has announced that they also did the tests on dogs and they received similar results. The dogs were given advanced brain cancer and just about every dog that was implanted with the cancer has responded and over 20 of the animals tested showed vast improvement.

The exact results have yet to be published for other doctors to review the study and determine if there has been anything missed. However, the announcement has created great furor among those involved in cancer research. Those who have been studying cancer for a long time also cautioned that many tests that have proven promising in mice and other animals have turned out to be less effective to outright harmful to humans.

The research lab has done some testing on monkeys, which are about as close to humans as researchers could get. They say that the tests have been encouraging and that the safety tests have, in particular, been successful. They plan to start safety tests on humans with solid tumors in hospitals in Melbourne later this year.

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