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Storm kills 5 in North Carolina, heads for New England

Bryan Alaspa's picture

A huge storm that dumped torrential rains on the southern state of North Carolina is now headed straight for New England for the weekend. The storm is now blamed for the deaths of five people and is the remnants of a former tropical storm. The storm washed out roads, closed bridges and brought more rain to some parts of North Carolina than they would normally get in months.

The storm has been riding along the Eastern coast of the United States for much of the week. The hardest hit state, so far, has been North Carolina. Now tendrils of the storm have reached as far north as Maine. In Jacksonville, North Carolina, there was a point where the city received 12 inches in six hours, which amounts to a quarter of its normal annual rainfall.

In North Carolina an SUV skidded off the road during the torrential rain

The accident killed four people including two children. The accident happened about 145 miles north of Raleigh. The car slid off the slick road and into a water-filled ditch beside the road. The fifth victim appeared to be a drowning when the pickup truck slid off the road and into a flooded and swollen river.

The weather service has issued flood warnings all across the East Coast. High winds are also expected. The National Weather Service is monitoring a number of rivers throughout the Eastern portion of the United States. The Conestoga River in Pennsylvania is one and the Schuylkill River near Reading, PA is another. The Baker River in Vermont along with the Pemigewasset River are also on the watch list.

For some the weather is good news as it has been extraordinarily dry in the Northeast this summer. However, for most, the storm is a nuisance. The forecast, once the storm has finally passed, is for cooler and drier air for much of the region.

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