Error message

Deprecated function: The each() function is deprecated. This message will be suppressed on further calls in menu_set_active_trail() (line 2405 of /home/hulijedw/public_html/includes/menu.inc).

Yukon Men: George doesn't make it home, Tanana mourns his loss

Mechele R. Dillard's picture

George Roberts did not make it back to Tanana, and the town comes together to honor his life on the Discovery Channel's Yukon Men.

Many fans of reality shows have grown cynical of the genre. Shows have become so scripted and predictable, there seems to be little-to-no “reality” left, only the “show.” However, last night on the Discovery Channel’s hit, Yukon Men, fans learned that sometimes reality rears its head, regardless of what the producers, actors or viewers would like to see on the small screen.

Forty-year-old Tanana resident George Roberts, known to the locals simply as “G,” went missing in a recent episode. Fans likely assumed he would return this week, because, after all, this is television. But, unfortunately, unhappily and definitely tragically, George met his fate while trying to cross the Tanana River on his way back from a goose hunting expedition. Residents had been hopeful that he would be found alive, as he was a skilled woodsman and was capable of surviving many situations, but, unfortunately, rescuers soon came to realize that, following the snowmobile tracks in the area where he was last seen, the most likely scenario was that he had met with tragedy on the thawing Tanana River.

“We found George,” Stan Zuray said solemnly. “He didn’t make it.”

“The only reason George is not here with us today is because he hit his head,” Charlie Wright, George’s brother-in-law, explained. “The snowmobile flipped up, hit something and flipped up, hit the ice wrong, and that’s it. Just takes one little mistake. That’s a hell of a loss, to lose one of your loved ones like that, to the river.”

“I learned so much from him,” Bob, Charlie’s son and George’s nephew, said. “The guy is amazing, you know? Losing my uncle, it’s tough.”

A small town like Tanana, with less than 200 residents, feels such a loss hard. And, the whole town came out to support the family and honor George.

“Everybody is close here,” Charlie said. “It’s like one family.”

“The loss of any one person in this village is incredibly significant,” Stan said. “Everybody is so close.”

Stan’s son, Joey, was one of the last people to see George, and was taking the loss hard.

“It’s going to be tough on him for a long time to come,” Stan said.

Custom dictates that the family host a funeral potlatch—a feast for the whole community. At a funeral potlatch, moose is served as the main course. This could have been a true burden on the family at this time of mourning, if the community were not so ready to come together and support one another. Stan went out hunting the moose (it is permissible, he explained, to kill a moose out of season for a funeral potlatch) and, when he dropped one, all of the men of Tanana came to help dress it out and get it ready for the potlatch meal. It was truly inspiring, to see how the residents of the town supported the family and how they honored their fallen son, brother, uncle, cousin and friend.

Goodbye, G; well-wishes to his family and all of Tanana.

Yukon Men airs on the Discovery Channel on Friday nights at 10/9c.

Would you like to read more about Yukon Men? Search "Yukon Men" right here on Huliq.

UPDATED: Charlie hunts a deadly black bear

Image: Discovery Channel

Comments

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
Haha, sorry to say it, but this is kinda poetic justice- this guy goes like so many of the animals he surely has killed. And guess what you right wing jerks- I'm a hunter and taxidermist, so piss off if you think I'm a treehugger. I DO hunt my own food, but I don't receive this same blood lust disgusting thrill from killing as these people seem to. I'm not in denial that life must die for us, but this show is just a portrait of boys flexing their muscles over nature, not because they have to, but because they choose to. Snaring, trapping, as showcased in this pathetic show means drowning, freezing, and suffocating by strangulation, not humane by any imagination! And where do most of the furs go?...let me guess, China? Yeah, exactly.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
Haha, sorry to say it, but this is kinda poetic justice- this guy goes like so many of the animals he surely has killed. And guess what you right wing jerks- I'm a hunter and taxidermist, so piss off if you think I'm a treehugger. I DO hunt my own food, but I don't receive this same blood lust disgusting thrill from killing as these people seem to. I'm not in denial that life must die for us, but this show is just a portrait of boys flexing their muscles over nature, not because they have to, but because they choose to. Snaring, trapping, as showcased in this pathetic show means drowning, freezing, and suffocating by strangulation, not humane by any imagination! And where do most of the furs go?...let me guess, China? Yeah, exactly.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
While scanning for something on television that was of value I came across the description of yukon men. It caught my interest. I am an ecologist with a graduate degree in bioddiversity conservation. In the past I have lived in wilderness areas for lengthy periods of time and I realize the risks and the challenges and the rewards of this lifestyle. I am not squeamish and I respect the food chain and natural selection. So I decided to view the show.My first image however was that of a lynx stuck in a steel jaw leg hold trap. Three men with rifles and yet everyone seemed so intent on focusing upon the DEADLY RISKS involved. Shame on each one of you. Stop bragging about what big men you are and demonstrate some respect toward the environment you chose.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
Dude, STFU

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
Hey guys incredible respect to all the folks of this town, I've been watching, amazed at the toughness of these folks, I like Joey,as much as the others but I wish he could see what we see when he disrespected his dad, who was helping him,I have very much respect for the man Charlie, what a community servant,he is a great guy to that town,I hope Joey gets his house moved and again what an awesome show, I love watching

Submitted by Ellen Hejna (not verified) on
Dear People of Tanana! My condolences to George's family and friends. I've watched this program from the beginning, it feels as though I know you all personally. You all are true people of the tundra. You live decent and free as we all are meant to be. I love that your community is like a big family who does pull together and laughs, cries, and live life to the fullest!. My heart goes out to you all. I feel as if I know you all, as beloved neighbors. I live in a small city where I feel I am alone most of the time. God Bless you all and know that George is smililng down on you! He will be sorely missed! Love to you all and keep being the free and strong people you are!!! Ellen Hejna

Pages

Add new comment