What Grit Sandpaper For Drywall?

When it comes to sanding, knowing what grit sandpaper for drywall is crucial for achieving a smooth and even surface.

With so many options available, it can be difficult to know which grit to use for your specific project.

In this article, we will guide you through the process of selecting the best grit sandpaper for drywall.

First, it is important to understand that the grit of sandpaper refers to the size of the abrasive particles on its surface.

The higher the grit number, the finer the particles and the smoother the finish.

For drywall sanding, it is recommended to use sandpaper with a grit between 100 and 220.

Coarse grits, such as 80 or 60, can be used for initial sanding of rough spots or patches, but finer grits should be used for the final sanding.

When selecting sandpaper for drywall, you should also consider the type of sandpaper to use.

Sandpaper sheets, sanding sponges, and sanding screens are all viable options.

Each has its own advantages and disadvantages, so it is important to choose the best one for your project.

By understanding the different grits and types of sandpaper available, you can ensure that your drywall sanding project is a success.

What Grit Sandpaper For Drywall?

When it comes to sanding drywall, it’s essential to choose the right grit sandpaper to achieve the desired finish.

Here are some tips to help you choose the right grit sandpaper for your drywall project:

Consider the Type of Drywall Compound

The type of drywall compound you’re using will determine the grit sandpaper you need.

If you’re using a lightweight joint compound, you’ll need a finer grit sandpaper.

On the other hand, if you’re using a heavier joint compound, you’ll need a coarser grit sandpaper.

Choose The Right Grit Sandpaper

For most drywall repairs, a 150-grit sandpaper is the best option.

This is considered to be a medium-grit sandpaper, which means that it’s not too coarse or too fine.

This gives you enough traction to smooth out issues with your compound.

However, if you’re dealing with rough areas or dried compound, you can start with semi-coarse sandpaper of 100 or 120 grit, then continue with 150 grit to smooth the areas further.

Know The Different Types Of Sandpaper

There are several different kinds of gritted sandpaper on the market.

Here are some of the most common types:

  • Aluminum-oxide sandpaper: This type of sandpaper lasts longer because they wear away more slowly compared to the others.
  • Garnet sandpaper: This type of sandpaper is usually tarnish brown.
  • Silicon-carbide sandpaper: This type of sandpaper is usually black and also known as wet/dry sandpaper.

When it comes to drywall sanding, you should always choose aluminum-oxide sandpaper.

They are more durable and last longer, which means you’ll need to replace them less frequently.

In conclusion, choosing the right grit sandpaper is crucial for achieving a smooth and professional finish on your drywall project.

Keep in mind the type of drywall compound you’re using, and choose the right grit sandpaper accordingly.

Preparation For Sanding

Before you start sanding drywall, it is essential to take necessary safety measures and gather all the required tools and materials.

Safety Measures

Sanding drywall can create a lot of dust, which can be harmful to your health if inhaled.

Therefore, it is crucial to wear a dust mask and safety goggles to protect your eyes and lungs from dust particles.

Additionally, you should wear long-sleeved shirts and gloves to protect your skin from irritation caused by the drywall dust.

Tools and Materials

To sand drywall, you will need the following tools and materials:

  • Sandpaper: The grit of the sandpaper you use depends on the stage of sanding.
    • For rough areas, use 100 or 120 grit sandpaper and then move to 150 grit for smoothing.
    • For final sanding, use 220 grit sandpaper.
  • Sanding block: A sanding block will help you to sand the drywall evenly and prevent creating low spots.
  • Taping knife: You will need a taping knife to apply joint compound to the drywall.
  • Drop cloths: Cover the floor with drop cloths to prevent dust and debris from settling on the floor.
  • Window box fan: Use a window box fan to ventilate the room and keep the dust from spreading.
  • Sanding sponges: Sanding sponges are useful for smoothing out small areas and hard-to-reach corners.
  • Bucket of water: Keep a bucket of water handy to clean your tools and wash your hands.

By following these safety measures and gathering the necessary tools and materials, you can prepare yourself for a successful drywall sanding project.

Sanding Techniques

Manual Sanding

When it comes to sanding drywall, manual sanding can be a good option.

You can use a sanding block, sanding sponge, or sandpaper sheets to sand the drywall.

Sanding blocks and sponges are great for flat surfaces, while sheets are better for corners and edges.

To get the best results, start with a coarse grit sandpaper, such as 100 or 120, to remove any rough spots or high spots.

Then, move on to a finer grit sandpaper, such as 150, to smooth out the surface.

Be sure to sand evenly and avoid applying too much pressure, which can cause the drywall to become uneven or damaged.

Using Power Sanders

Power sanders can be a faster and more efficient option for sanding drywall.

You can use a hand-held orbital sander, a pole sander, or a drywall vacuum sander.

When using a power sander, be sure to wear a dust mask and goggles to protect yourself from the dust.

If you’re using a hand-held sander, start with a coarse grit sandpaper, such as 80 or 100, to remove any rough spots or high spots.

Then, move on to a finer grit sandpaper, such as 120 or 150, to smooth out the surface.

When using a pole sander or a vacuum sander, start with a medium grit sandpaper, such as 120, and then move on to a finer grit, such as 150.

No matter which sanding technique you choose, be sure to sand in a circular or back-and-forth motion to avoid creating lines or patterns on the surface.

Remember, sanding drywall can be a messy job, so be sure to wear protective gear and cover any nearby surfaces to prevent dust from spreading.

Finishing Touches

After sanding the drywall with the appropriate grit sandpaper, you are now ready for the finishing touches.

This step is crucial in achieving a smooth and polished surface.

Final Inspection

Before proceeding to the final touches, inspect the drywall surface for any imperfections.

Use a bright light source and hold it parallel to the wall to reveal any bumps, ridges, or scratches.

If you notice any flaws, use a fine-grit sandpaper to smooth them out. Repeat the process until you are satisfied with the result.

Cleanup and Dust Removal

Drywall sanding can create a lot of dust that can be harmful if inhaled.

Always wear a dust mask and use a shop vacuum to clean up the dust as you work.

After sanding, use a damp cloth to wipe the wall to remove any remaining dust.

Make sure the wall is completely dry before proceeding to the next step.

In conclusion, following these simple steps will help you achieve a smooth and polished drywall surface.

Remember to use the appropriate grit sandpaper, inspect the wall for imperfections, and clean up the dust after sanding.

With these tips, your drywall will look like it was done by a professional.

Key Takeaways

When it comes to sanding drywall, choosing the right grit sandpaper is crucial to achieving a smooth and seamless finish.

Here are the key takeaways to keep in mind:

  • For rough sanding, use a 100-grit sandpaper to remove any bumps, ridges, or imperfections on the surface.
  • For the final sanding, use a 120- or 150-grit sandpaper to create a flawless finish.
  • Avoid using sandpaper that is too rough or too fine, as it can damage the drywall or create an uneven finish.
  • Always wear safety equipment, such as goggles and a mask, to protect your eyes and lungs from dust and debris.
  • Take your time and be patient, as rushing the sanding process can lead to mistakes and a less-than-perfect finish.

By following these tips and using the appropriate grit sandpaper for each stage of the sanding process, you can achieve a professional-looking finish on your drywall project.

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Author at Huliq.

Written By James Huliq